Portfolio > 3 Tributaries - MACA Thesis / 3 part community exhibition

Tributary 2
collograph prints on paper
2 ft x 95 yd
2011
Tributary 2
collograph prints on paper
2 ft x 95 yd
2011
Tributary 2 (detail)
collograph prints on paper
2 ft x 95 yd
2011
Tributary 1 (detail)
cardboard, fabric, plastic, ink
2011
Tributary 1 (detail)
inked collograph plates
2011
Tributary 1 (detail)
inked collograph plates
2011
Tributary 3
inked collograph plates
54" x 92"
2011
Tributary 2 & 3 (WIP)
collograph prints and plates
2011
Tributary 2 (WIP)
collograph prints
24" x 50 yd
2011
Work in Progress
hand printed collographs
24" x 50 yd
2011
evite
2011

Maryland Institute College of Art, MACA Thesis 2011

Community Exhibitions at:
Better Waverly's 901 Arts, Baltimore, MD
Jubilee Arts, Baltimore, MD
MICA, Fox 3 Gallery, Baltimore, MD

Domestic violence knows no boundaries and carries no discrimination. Row houses are the subject of my newest pieces, and part of my continued goal to fight domestic violence pictorially. Even though the row houses are seemingly silent and static buildings, they embody the “souls” of those affected by violence. They are a narrative that helps to explain the magnitude of domestic violence incidents nationally and within Baltimore City, Maryland.


When is a house no longer a home?


Tributary 1 - In 2009, fifty three people died as a result of domestic violence in Maryland. The fifty three inked collograph plates shown here represent these individuals. Used as a metaphor for the effects of domestic violence, the process of inking inherently covers up the brightness or “life” of the plate.

Tributary 2 - Over 4,000 domestic violence cases were heard in Baltimore City Circuit Courts in 2009. I see these row house prints as the souls of those affected; a violent and fear-filled house is no longer a home.

Tributary 3 - According to national statistics, one in four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime. This overwhelming statistic is represented here in four large-scale collograph plates. The scale was chosen to correspond to the height of an average female or teenager.